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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
college graduates by 2020. we used to be number one. we are now no. 12. we are going to get back to no. 1 by the end of the decade. that is why we're revitalizing community colleges and reforming our education system based on what works, not is -- not on what is status quo. that is why we're fighting to make permanent our new tax credit. that will mean $10 million for tuition relief for each child going to -- $10,000 for tuition relief for each child going to college. we see an america where the middle class is the bleeding heart of the economy. that is why we passed health insurance reform to stop insurance companies from jacking up your premium, then drop coverage when you are sick or have a pre-existing condition. that is why we passed financial reform, to end taxpayer bailouts. to stop on wall street banks from taking advantage of the people. we want to compete on service, on good products and good prices. that is why we are trying to make it easier for workers to pay for retirement and fighting efforts by some parties for social security, because the phone if i am president, no one i
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
and put natural gas to work for us. it is good for everything. it is good for the economy, employment. the atmosphere, the planet. if we do not do it, we will all be dead. in there are plenty of reasons to do it. [laughter] [applause] >> this next question will be a little sticky for you, because you are partners with -- on this project, the summer on project. you are partners with this southern company. to go we're trying to coopt the energy. -- >> we are trying to coop the energy. the seven companies in the southeast wind and solar power, the least productive part of the country. they have to bring it in from a long way away. that means we have to have a transmission system. we have to have national standards so we can go across state lines. it needs to be implemented right now and not 10 years from now. we have to use the same kind of laws that we didn' -- we have to get it done and get it done fast. i am perfectly happy to have plenty of windmills and solar panels on my land and transmission lines. i care about my country and my friends and my grandchildren more than i do about al
on for a time frame, even though the dispersant used was pre authorized, the issue that seemed to be elevated to a national response team in washington at some point, a decision was made that the epa should play a more active role, then call for. on may 20, and you advised bp to reduce the application of dispersant and provide the availability of less toxic dispersants. please help us understand your concerns and the process you went through in conjunction with the other federal agencies. the epa had more of a commanding role than anticipated than in the area contingency plan. is there some recommendation you can provide to us about what kind of guideline that we might recommend that would elevate the decision making to more routine decisions of these dispersants to these extraordinary kinds of decisions? >> thanks. i will probably end where you ended. there is a need for those kinds of guidelines. every day you make the decisions that are before you. over time, one of the things i discussed often is duke are not only looking at the decision before you that today, but also at the response. fr
not trust us, they will not keep coming back. continue >> and a month-long look at privacy in communications policy. >> the c-span video library is a great resource to see what is happening in washington. find the most recent events covered, those most watched, and most covered -- all free. >> governor tim pawlenty is widely considered to be contemplating a presidential run in 2012. he recently sat down with c-span to talk about his plans for the future. this is just under 40 minutes. >> has there been a defining moment for you as governor of minnesota? >> probably many, but i will give you two. one is the support we have given to the men and women in a national -- national military, and the national guard. we have stepped up in unprecedented ways to support them. we lead the nation in the beyond the yellow ribbon campaign. the other thing, for minnesota, i am in stick it has been liberal through history, and for me to draw a line on driving down government spending and will be on cutting taxes is something i'm also proud of. >> the president has said that next year in july 2011, it is a tra
level. >> can over use of tbacco and alcohol create a system occurred disease -- create epistemic heart disease? if they served in vietnam and they gotta regardless of their lifestyle, it is our poblem? >> yes. we cannot parse that out. >> with respect to the rebuttal a presumption, they claim examiners in the regional officers are not making a medical opinion like that. if there is clear evidence of risk factors or heart disase, when they request the examination, it is appropriate for them to ask the clinician in light of this risk factor. is it as likely as not that the current disability is due to herbicide exposure? we will then award benets based on what the commission says para. >> it to be very difficult -- it would be very difficult for a doctor to say it was herbicide exposure. >> i do not believe so. >> it is difficult to parse o. we do know from the studies th the iom is rigorous enough for us to give weight to them. six of the studies were strong and specifically as a dividend in making the tie between herbicide exposure and epistemic heart disease. we have to make this conn
government here in washington, d.c. >> if you think it is a federal policy to use the filibuster to block any legislation? >> i think we should do everything we can to extend the current tax rates. raising taxes on anyone, especially small business, is the wrong prescription for an ailing economy. >> the republican party has harnessed the voter sentiment. >> i think that most of the uprising that we have seen thus far we have seen in the primaries. now that we are out of the primary season, all of our candidates have to work closely with all of these americans that are newly engaged in their government. we want to encourage americans to take an active role in their government because when americans are engaged, washington listens. when the american people are not engaged, then the politicians are in charge. we have seen what that has led to. >> what impact did the primaries have? >> alito that they and other americans will stay engaged in what is happening in washington on a daily basis. if they work with their members, both democrats and republicans, they can drive the debate and they can dr
us tonight. let's get started >> it is great to be with all of you here. thank you for letting us into your home this evening. i started out like most businesses do in a small business. i typed, answered phones for a small company. my husband started out driving a pittsburgh for the city of pennsylvania. i am running for public office now because i like most of you think our country is headed in the wrong direction. frank and i are worried our two granddaughters will not have the same opportunity we had. i have created jobs. i have cut spending and solved problems. i think we need some common sense and practical problem solving. barbara boxer has been in washington, d.c. for 28 years. she may say many things to night. her track record is clear. the results of her policies are devastating for this state. in the last 20 months alone, unemployment has grown, debt has grown on its way to $20 trillion. she may say she is fighting for cal forrians. but the truth is she is fighting hardest for another six years in washington, d.c. >> it is wonderful to be here. thanks you to the good peo
country. thanks for joining us on "washington journal" and will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern half to take your calls. . >> happening right now on c-span 2, the impeachment trial of louisiana federal judge thomas porteus accused of taking bribes. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] senators are considering a judicial nomination before resuming debate on a small business bond. the bill includes $12 billion in tax breaks, an additional small business support for it live coverage when the senate comes in this afternoon at 2: 30 eastern. domestic manufacturing and energy efficiency, live coverage on cspan when the house gavels in tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> every weekend on cspan 3, experience american history. 48 hours of people and events telling the american story. here historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts by events that shaped our nations. visit museums, historical sites, and college campuses as professors and leading historians tell them to america's past. am
a recommendation -- a decision by the president and whether that would be useful at the time. >> he has not traveled much. that is because he has a full- time job. >> do you think anything has been changed with what the people in afghanistan are asking? second, china's rise of the military in the indian ocean -- >> first of all, i think the elections took place despite the fact that the taliban are trying to disrupt them. there are lower levels of violence then there were during the presidential elections last year. at the end of the day, there was still a lot of effort put in by the taliban to intimidate voters. it undoubtedly had an impact on the turnout. a higher percentage of women in this election than in the presidential election. certainly there were a lot of complaints about the election that will have to be adjudicated, but i think having held the elections, the afghans were in the lead in terms of security for the elections. i think it is an important landmark that they have had these elections and that we can now move forward and tabulate the results of the election. >> milit
fiercely for you and was very inspired by your message of hope. . . this is pretty remarkable. most of us, in fact, i am just looking around the room. i think it is fair to say that nobody remembers the economy of the great depression, so the worst economy that we have gone through, maybe one, maybe one, maybe a couple, but you guys look really good for your age. the 1981 recession, and this was worse than the three other recessions combined in terms of job loss and how it affected incomes, so that is going to have an effect on the entire generation. it means that they are worried about the future in a way that most of us were not worried. i think that this generation, the suns generation, they do not take things for granted. i think they think about the community and other people. they do not have a narrow focus. i am very impressed with it. their future will be fine, but in the short term, what i say to them is, first of all, we are doing everything we can to make sure they can get the best education. one of the things that we did this year is we were able to change the student loan pro
him lessons that then he goes on to use to great effect later. host: political oper tunist? guest: yes. host: yoo license is s. grant? guest: he is considered one of the highest oper tunists and because of that he gets thrown out, because he really didn't have any political experience before he became president. so is his breath number, the number of positions he eserved end up way outside the norm. host: harry trueman. guest: trueman is one of those interesting things. as i recall, i would have to go back and look at my data. but as i recall he is actually an oper tunist, but it's because he served sort of short term in many of his underlying positions. host: barack obama. guest: he is officially not. but there was one from the 2008 election that actually had one of the highest scores. certainly higher than president clinton. host: why? guest: because he had run for more offices in a short period of time, where as senator clinton, at the time i counted her first lady experience as essentially one position, eight years. so that essentially disadvantages her. host: with barack obama, di
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)